Tag Archives: Grace Kelly wedding gown

Of Weekends and Wedding Gowns

Hello-Hello and welcome to an almost-here-weekend!

Today we have a lengthy commitment away from the Prepatorium of the volunteering kind, so the post is brief and focused on one topic.  As everyone is no doubt aware (how could you not be with the insane levels of media attention dedicated to the matter), there are nuptials of note this weekend; we planned (and still plan) little coverage of the event, other than what we have done with other notable weddings, a possible look at the fashions sported by guests and the bride’s gown. We do adore looking at pretty gowns and party frocks.

We *have* been surprised at the number of inquiries we are receiving about dresses worn by other high-profile brides, in particular the number of questions about Caroline Kennedy’s dress. (More about that in a moment) To answer those questions we have decided to look at styles worn by some of these more notable brides, beginning with Jacqueline Bouvier, upon the occasion of her marriage to then Senator John F. Kennedy.

Via BrideChic

The ivory silk taffeta dress took two months to make, requiring more than 50 yards of silk.

JFK Library

More on the gown from the JFK Library:

“It was the creation of Ann Lowe, an African-American dress-maker born in Grayton, Alabama, who had designed gowns for the matrons of high society families including the du Pont, Lodge, and Auchincloss families. Ms. Lowe was 54 when she designed the Bouvier wedding dress, which featured a portrait neckline and bouffant skirt decorated with interwoven bands of tucking and tiny wax flowers.”

Tricia Nixon was married while her father was president, so that event was a White House wedding. Her gown was by Priscilla of Boston, an establishment visited by yours truly when seeking a dress.

Life Magazine

Another President’s daughter wearing Priscilla?

AP Photo

Luci Johnson and Patrick Nugent are seen as they leave the Shrine of the Immaculate Conception; Luci’s sister Lynda, accompanied by the groom’s father, Gerard Nugent, holds the bridal gown train.

Style icon Grace Kelly’s wedding dress featured (among other things) exquisite lace, yards and yards of it.

The vision and designed for the gown came from MGM costume designer Helen Rose, it was actually made by the wardrobe department of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.

Philadelphia Museum of Art

The dress included rose point lace over silk faille and silk tulle, with seed pearls.

Another famous actress wearing a gown by Ms. Rose? Elizabeth Taylor, for her marriage to Nicky Hilton.

Princess Diana’s gown was immense.

The train alone was 25 feet in length.

There was a lot going on with this dress: the ruffled silk taffeta and lace gown also had enormous puffed sleeves, and decorated with hand embroidery and sequins. The gown was designed by David and Elizabeth Emanuel.

The royal wedding most recently featured in this space was that of Sweden’s Princess Victoria in June.

Torsten Laursen/Getty

This gown was created by Swedish designer Pär Engsheden, and made of pearl white silk duchesse. (Click here for our “Gowns and Crowns” post with oodles of pictures.)

The next royal wedding on most fashionista’s radar? That of Monaco’s Prince Albert II to South African swimming star and style-setter Charlene Wittstock, seen below attending the Swedish royal wedding mentioned above.

Pascal le Segretain/Getty

We close with our favorite gown, that worn by Caroline Kennedy for her wedding to Edwin Schlossberg.

The gown was a Carolina Herrera design in white silk organza, with a rounded neck, short sleeves, and a twenty-five-foot train.  Note the bodice of the gown, appliqued with embroidered white shamrocks.

Why is it our favorite? Why are the shamrocks of interest?  Well, loath as we are to talk about anything personal (honestly, what could be more tedious?), we will share that someone you know (in a cyber sense of the word) wore the same dress for her marriage to the most wonderful man in the galaxy, the Consort.

As soon as we saw the dress we knew it was The One, and sliding it on confirmed our first instinct.  We had only one dilemma. You see, the gown did not originally come with shamrocks, those were created specially for Ms. Kennedy.  In our case the debate was a bit more challenging: shamrocks to honor the bride’s heritage, or tulips, in honor of the groom’s background?

Ultimately we opted for neither, going with the gown’s original floral embellishment, a daisy. And thus, “The Daisy Dress” was named, that moniker remains what we call The Dress to this day.

On that blissful note we thank you for popping in, and hope everyone’s weekend is simply delightful!

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