A Big Year for Hermès

Hello-Hello, and Happy Friday! We’re all adither today, lots going on this weekend, a bit of travel, time with siblings and TQM, hopefully you are looking at a fun weekend as well.

We are brief today, and eager for a touch of Friday Fun, so we begin with something that has long been of interest to many readers, the classic Hermès bag.  The Daily Mail ran a fascinating story last week, “How a Hermès handbag is made: Photographs reveal French fashion house’s design secrets“.

Via RueLaLa

A spot of background from the story:

And now as the French fashion house celebrates its 175th birthday, its design secrets have been unveiled for the first time.

A series of photographs taken inside the famous Paris workshops showcase the craftsmanship required to create one of its bags, some of which cost in excess of £10,000.

The piece is loaded with great photos from Park & Cube.

via The Daily Mail

While we’re not sure this is “the first time” there have been photos from inside the atelier, the pictures from Park & Cube *are* fascinating.

Via Park & Cube

The photos reveal the level of detail in each bag.

Via Park & Cube

The amount of handwork that sets Hermès apart from many others is also evident.

Via Park & Cube

Work on ‘Constance’ bags was underway during the tour when these photos were taken.

Via Park & Cube

And where does the finished product go after work in the atelier is done?

Via Park & Cube

Right into the protective cover of one of those distinctive bags.

It really is a big year for Hermès, as this story in yesterday’s Telegraph reports:

“2012 is a special year for Hermès, Britain and London,” Hermes’ UK and Ireland managing director Thierry Outin told the gathered press at the launch of Leather Forever – an exhibition celebrating the heritage of the French luxury leather label…

The story is about the ‘Leather Forever‘ exhibit celebrating 175 years of Hermès, the London show opened to the public this week.

“Leather Forever”

One of the more interesting things in the Telegraph story addresses the scarcity of the Birkin bag.

“People ask us, is it a strategy?”, Outin tells me in answer to the age-old question about why their iconic Birkin and Kelly handbags are in such short supply. “But no, it simply takes so long to train our artisans. Plus, we like to keep our workshops ‘human-sized’. We like to know the names of every artisan, that to us is very important.”

One of the most amazing items in the show:

Hermès via The Telegraph

The pièce de résistance of the show lurks behind a thick curtain of curling leather spaghetti strands – a room displaying fantastical treasures from Hermès’ bespoke service, including a black patent calfskin wheelbarrow commissioned by the Duke of Windsor for Wallis Simpson in 1947, and a multi-coloured winged saddle (above).

Wow. Just, wow.

In honor of the 175th anniversary and accompanying exhibit the company will also do an online auction with Christies, four one-of-a-kind versions of its PasseGuide bag, the bag that most honors its equestrian heritage.

Christie’s & Hermès

The four bags are a tribute to the United Kingdom and Ireland, representing England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales. The auction for these begins Monday, the 14th; proceeds will go to the Royal Academy of Arts, where the exhibit is being shown.

For a great story on the company, it’s heritage and its future, the Telegraph has an outstanding piece.

‘Leather Forever’

Talk about some eye candy!

Advertisements

3 Comments

Filed under Friday Fun, preppy, Preppy clothing & brands, Preppy Fashion

3 responses to “A Big Year for Hermès

  1. Beautiful workmanship from Hermes. Someday my (or my husband’s) ship will come in….

  2. I’m not a Fan of the Birkin but I’ll have a Constance and a Kelly, please and Gosh, that blue colour is fetching ! Lovely, interesting post !

  3. Art. It’s simply art, and breathtaking art at that.

    It’s funny – I came to know Hermes through the riding world, so I knew the saddles (as in, admired them from afar) before the bags & such.

    Thank you for this, TP – off to check out this article (as well as your alter ego’s latest post).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s